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Want to get outside but don't know where you're allowed to go? Here's some help

The takeaway: don't go too far away when getting that outdoor relief.

PORTLAND, Ore. — There's no question these days that getting that outside time is critical to our mental health. But knowing exactly where we can go sometimes seems to add to the stress.

So, here's a breakdown. We'll start with state parks and natural areas.

If it's an Oregon or Washington-run park it is closed for now.

Oregon Parks and Recreation has this advice: if you're thinking of going somewhere that involves long distance travel, it's probably closed.

"So things like trailheads and campgrounds and scenic view points, all the big people places, are likely to be closed because that's where people congregate," said Chris Havel with Oregon Parks and Recreation.

State Parks also discourages trips to the mountain or back country, not because of the crowds, but because of the risk.

"If you have a breakdown, if you have an injury, all of the emergency services are really stressed right now and search and rescue crews, that applies to them too," Havel said. 

So what does that leave?

"My recommendation: look at your neighborhood, your backyard, your local park if it's walking rolling distance from where you live," Havel said.

RELATED: Coronavirus: Oregon, Washington close all national forest sites, trails across 24M acres

All 200-plus Portland parks are still open.

"The great news is that you can go for a hike in a Portland park or natural area, you can go run around and be free," said Portland Parks and Recreation spokesman Mark Ross. 

However the playgrounds, skate parks, sport courts, and sport fields are closed. The parks are also closed to all car traffic.

Park restrooms are still open.

"Yes, were' stocking bathrooms. We have 54 bathrooms citywide with soap or hand sanitizer," said Ross.

The takeaway: don't go too far away when getting that outdoor relief.

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RELATED: Connecting with nature, even just looking out the window, can reduce stress and anxiety