PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon jail is no longer honoring U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers for people entering the jail on local charges.

The Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility in The Dalles, known as NORCOR, officially changed its policy last month after settling a lawsuit with a man who claimed officials at the jail violated his constitutional rights, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported .

The policy change and lawsuit show NORCOR honored ICE detainers, despite a 2014 court ruling that found ICE detainers did not provide independent authority to jails to hold people past the time when they should have been released on their local charges.

A detainer calls for immigrants living in or entering the country illegally or without legal permission to be held until federal agents can arrive to take them into custody.

NORCOR, about 80 miles (128 kilometers) east of Portland, serves as the regional jail for four neighboring counties: Gilliam, Hood River, Wasco and Sherman. The jail also houses detainees in ICE custody that federal immigration officers bring to and from the jail.

The jail's website says it will continue to house ICE detainees, but will no longer accept ICE detainers for people who come into the jail on local charges. The new policy went into effect April 2, according to NORCOR's website.

"This means that these individuals will be allowed to post bail and be released pursuant to their state court stipulations and conditions," the website said. "Therefore, if a detainee has finished their sentence, been released by the court, or posted bail, they will not be held past their release."

NORCOR administrator Bryan Brandenberg was not available for an interview.

The jail changed its policy after settling a lawsuit with Javier Maldonado, of Hood River, who was detained at the jail for 19 hours in July 2017.

Maldonado filed the lawsuit in December. The jail agreed to pay Maldonado $40,000. His attorneys declined an interview.