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Q: Is it true that George W. Bush took more vacation days than Barack Obama?

A: Yes. Before his two-week trip to Martha's Vineyard in August, Obama's count was 125 full or partial days and Bush's total at the same point in his presidency was 407.

Our inbox is chock full of questions about who took more vacation days, Obama or Bush. (The short answer: Bush. The long answer: There's no such thing as a true non-working vacation for the president.)

The recent barrage from our readers coincides with Obama's 15-day family vacation on Martha's Vineyard — he returned to the White House on Aug. 24 – which occurred during major news events including the beheading of a U.S. journalist by Islamic militants and protests in Ferguson, Mo., after a police officer shot and killed an unarmed 18-year-old black man. The vacation also occurred during the funeral of Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the only general officer killed in Afghanistan.

Obama faced criticism for being on vacation during these times, but those types of complaints are nothing new — either to Obama or presidents in general.

Readers may recall the criticism directed at Bush for the August weeks spent at his ranch in Crawford, Texas. Others may remember Democrats chastising Dwight Eisenhower for spending time on the golf course.

We last dealt with the who-took-more-vacation question in January 2010, at which point Obama had spent 26 days on "vacation" during his first year in office, fewer than the first-year totals for George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush or Ronald Reagan. Our numbers are all courtesy of CBS News White House Correspondent Mark Knoller, who has covered every president since Gerald Ford and tracks the commander in chief's travel.

But, as we noted then, presidents never fully escape from the job. Knoller told us he doesn't consider these days away from the White House real "vacation" days. He said then in an e-mail: "I have long held the view that a US president is never really on vacation. The job — and its awesome powers and responsibilities — is his wherever he is and whatever he's doing."

Bush officials called the Crawford ranch the "Western White House" to emphasize the days there involved plenty of official business, and Obama's recent Martha's Vineyard break included several presidential statements and two days spent back at the White House in the middle of the "vacation." Presidents may clear brush or hit the links, but they are never actually off the clock.

Still, much is made of these presidential vacation days — and how to count them. Knoller doesn't include visits to Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland often used to host foreign leaders. On Aug. 8, the day before Obama left for Martha's Vineyard, Knoller tweeted that Obama had spent 125 full or partial days on vacation, and at the same point in Bush's presidency, he had spent 381 days at his Texas ranch plus 26 days at his parents' home in Kennebunkport, Maine, for a total of 407.

When we e-mailed Knoller on Aug. 26, Obama was up to 140 days by his count. Bush's total for his two terms in office is 533 days, which includes 490 at the ranch and the rest at Kennebunkport. For comparison's sake, Bill Clinton's total is 174 days, and Reagan hit 390 (349 at his ranch and 41 in Palm Springs), according to Knoller.

Adding in Camp David visits would bring Obama's total to date to 223 (that's 83 days at Camp David) and Bush's total for his entire time in office to 1,024 (491 days at the presidential retreat). Note that Obama still has more than two years in office to narrow the gap.

Deciding how to count these "vacation" days can create some confusion. CNN recently listed a count of 879 days for Bush and 150 for Obama, numbers that came from a Washington Post "Outlook" piece on "Five myths on presidential vacations." (Myth No. 1: "Presidents get vacations.") The 879 figure, it turns out, is from March 3, 2008, at which point Bush had spent that many days at the ranch and Camp David (but it doesn't include days in Kennebunkport). The numbers are in a 2008 Washington Post piece and attributed to Knoller.

If readers want to make an apples-to-apples comparison, the best solution is to use Knoller's figures as of Aug. 8, cited above: Bush, 407; Obama, 125. But the numbers say more about how many days the presidents spent away from the White House than they do about how much time the presidents spent not working.

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