Amazon CEO recovers Apollo moon engines from Atlantic

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

Apollo 14 rocket takes off from launch pad on January 31, 1971. The Apollo XIV mission, the third mission to land on the moon, was launched on January 31, 1971 and landed on the moon on February 5, 1971.

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by LORI MATSUKAWA / KING 5 News and Associated Press

kgw.com

Posted on March 21, 2013 at 9:31 AM

OFF CAPE CANAVERAL -- After three weeks at sea, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' expedition recovered two mammoth rocket engines that he believes boosted  Apollo astronauts to the moon.

The vessel Seabed Worker is chugging toward Cape Canaveral with two F-1 engines plucked by remote controlled vehicles off the ocean floor three miles below.  On the "Bezos Expeditions" website, Bezos says he wants the hardware to tell its true story, including the five thousand mile per hour re-entry. 

"We're excited to get this hardware on display where just maybe, it will inspire something amazing," he wrote.

Bezos described how the Apollo 11 mission to the moon in 1969 fascinated him as a five-year old. Each of the five F-1 engines on the Saturn V rocket produced 1.5 million pounds of thrust and burned 6,000 pounds of rocket fuel every second.  After burning a few minutes, they separated from the module and plunged back to Earth, as planned.  A few days later, Neil Armstrong walked on the moon.

The engines are the property of NASA, which congratulated Bezos on his efforts. On his website, Bezos said serial numbers will have to be checked to confirm these engines were part of the Apollo 11 mission.  He said he would like one of them to be displayed at the Smithsonian "for all to see." He said he has already asked NASA to consider displaying another one at Seattle's Museum of Flight.  He said he hopes the displays will inspire a few more youth to "invent and explore."

 





 

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