The color of your outfit sends message in job interview

The color of your outfit sends message in job interview

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by CATHY MARSHALL, KGW Staff

kgw.com

Posted on April 19, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Updated Friday, Apr 20 at 9:22 AM

PORTLAND -- What color you choose for a job interview sends a sublimial message to the potential employer, according to job experts.

Portland Career Coach Stacey Lane tells clients to go conservative. “I think being conservatively dressed is still important because people want to feel like you will blend in,” explained Lane.

Ben Nally and Melissa Anderson are Clark College students in search of suits.  They’re checking out the racks at this year’s Dress for Success two-day shopping event on campus.

“I’ve never done this in my life – even to the Prom I just wore a nice shirt,” said Nally.

“I have lots of frilly, girly clothes but I want to fit in and look professional,” added Anderson.

Each of the college shoppers can pick one free outfit to get them ready for an upcoming career fair.  What they wear to an interview is important.

According to Kim Zoller at Image Dynamics, 55 per cent of another person’s perception of you is based on how you look.

In her article “ What are the Best Colors to Wear to an Interview” Zoller identifies blue as giving off an authoritative and trustworthy vibe.

Business writer Angela Harris recommends wearing navy blue. Black though, can give off a distant or arrogant tone. Brown may make you seem calm and level-headed while gray is a good choice for sending an authoritative signal.  Red is a risky choice since it evokes more emotion than any other color.  Green is viewed as more middle of the road.

“[You should be] thinking would I wear this to the office? And if you would, it might be a good choice for you,” said Stacey Lane. As students make wardrobe selections, they can also ask Dress for Success staffers advice.

“Ask the person that’s going to be interviewing you, 'What’s your dress code?'” recommended Lane.

Back at Clark College, Ben Nally made his selection. He chose a dark navy coat and light blue shirt.

“I’m stylin’. I’m rockin’ it,” he joked.

Melissa Anderson chose a dark suit with tiny pink accents.

“I feel confident and ready to go out and help business professionals,” she said as she left with her bag of new clothes.

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