Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man's life

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man's life

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by Nina Mehlhaf, KGW Staff

kgw.com

Posted on June 3, 2014 at 1:49 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jun 3 at 8:36 PM

CLACKAMAS, Ore. -- A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called Pulse Point saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse.  The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car. 

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn't even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

"I was completely, completely gone," Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a Pulse Point alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

"When the app went off, I'd never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps," Brawner said as he stood next to Basse's hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that's when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse's car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the Pulse Point alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks.  Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving Pulse Point a lot of credit. "This Pulse Point app, it's just a must," Basse said. "It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone."

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

"In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life." Basse said. "That's what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn't be here right now if it wasn't for him."

"I would love to see other people do the same thing," Brawner said. "If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we've given Drew back with everybody that's helped him."

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of Pulse Point. It's a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

The app is free for iPhone and Android devices.

More: Pulse Point smart phone app

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