June 26, 2012: Construction Update

June 26, 2012: Construction Update

June 26, 2012: Construction Update

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by Bob Sallinger

kgw.com

Posted on June 25, 2012 at 7:48 AM

Updated Tuesday, Oct 29 at 8:02 PM

I went down to South Waterfront on Sunday afternoon to watch the osprey and check out the construction. The nestling is now visible in the nest from the ground below--if you watch closely you will periodically see its head bobbing up and down especially when the parents bring in fish to feed it.

The construction is indeed associated with the greenway restoration as I suggested in my prior email. It is quite close to the nest but not quite as close as it appears on the video screen. I have included a photo to provide you with a perspective from the ground.

Return to Osprey Cam

The entire greenway is being torn up so it looks like it will be difficult to minimize activity in close proximity to the nest. However we will check in with the city today. As noted previously, this restoration has been planned for literally years. The length of time it will take and restrictions put in place to protect federally listed salmon make rescheduling infeasible. The good news is that the osprey seem relatively unperturbed by the activity thus far. Ultimatley the restoration will leave the greenway healthier for all residents, including the osprey.

South Waterfront was teaming with bird activity on Sunday. Families of Canada geese (I counted at least 40 birds) grazed inside the greenway construction zone. Flocks of American goldfinches flew about the dahlia field beneath the osprey nest. The high pitch whistle and buzz of white crowned sparrows, always abundant at this site, filled the sunny afternoon. A killdeer performed its injured wing display to keep the farmer who tends the dahlias away from its nest. Across the river at Ross Island, herons continuously entered and exited the cottonwoods tending to their young. The osprey are the most visible wild residents of South Waterfront but a huge number of animals use our river's edge to migrate, breed and feed.

 

 

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