Obama visits tornado survivors...Study disputes major 'crack baby' problems...Japanese mayor says sorry for sex worker comment

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Associated Press

Posted on May 27, 2013 at 12:01 AM

Updated Monday, May 27 at 12:00 AM

MOORE, Okla. (AP) — President Barack Obama is telling the people of Moore, Okla., that "folks are behind you." Obama visited the tornado-devastated city on Sunday, consoling people staggered by the loss of life and property. The White House says the Federal Emergency Management Agency has already provided $57 million in rebates and incentives to help build about 12,000 storm shelters in Oklahoma. But Obama is also asking the American people to make contributions.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama marks Memorial Day by laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday. Then he'll deliver remarks. In Beverly, Mass., the city's Memorial Day parade has been called off because so few veterans are able to march. The parade has been a fixture in the town since the Civil War.

CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers say they have more evidence that the 1980s "crack baby" scare was overblown. They say there's little proof of any major long-term ill effects in children whose mothers used cocaine during pregnancy. University of Maryland pediatrics researcher Maureen Black says in Monday's journal Pediatrics online that behavior difficulties, attention problems, anxiety and worse school performance have been mostly small in children of crack users.

SYDNEY (AP) — A nurse in Sydney, Australia is admitting that he killed 11 elderly people and injured eight others by setting fire to the nursing home where he worked. Roger Dean was on duty in 2011 when he set the fire and later appeared on television describing his efforts to rescue trapped people. He faces possible life in prison.

TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese mayor is apologizing for saying two weeks ago that U.S. troops should patronize legal adult entertainment businesses to help reduce rapes and other assaults. Osaka Mayor Toru Hashimoto says his earlier remarks rose from a "sense of crisis" about cases of sexual assaults by U.S. military personnel on Japanese civilians in Okinawa. Hashimoto says now he understands his remark "could be construed as an insult to the U.S. forces and to the American people" and was inappropriate.

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