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Tornado season sees November spike

Tornado season sees November spike

by KGW Meteorologist Rod Hill

Bio | Email | Follow: @kgwrodhill

kgw.com

Posted on October 11, 2013 at 11:10 AM

Updated Wednesday, Oct 30 at 4:54 AM

 

It is well known that severe thunderstorm and tornado season in the United States is spring and early summer.  For folks living east of the Rocky Mountains, forecasters are reminding people to keep an eye on the sky until winter takes hold.  The month of November has seen a fall spike in tornadoes over the past 10 plus years. 

As cold air begins dropping south out of Canada, the first strong cold fronts of fall can collide with left over warm weather still building in the United States.  These last collisions of warm and cold often produce severe weather.  In addition, an active hurricane season can produce a spike in tornadic weather through the month of November.  Up to 52 percent of September tornadoes are connected to land falling tropical storms.  Once old man winter takes hold, the disappearance of warm tropical air leads to a downward plunge in the number of severe storms until the spring months reappear.

So far, 2013 is on pace to be a record low tornado year!  January has been the only month averaging above normal for tornadoes.  The bad news is that at least 46 people have died this year in the United States, connected to tornadoes.

The above information is courtesy of The Weather Channel.

Meteorologist Rod Hill, follow me @

www.facebook.com/kgwrodhill

 

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