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June 19, 2010 Update: Injured fledgling still recovering; Other fledgling sighted in wild

by Bob Sallinger

kgw.com

Posted on June 19, 2010 at 10:19 AM

Updated Saturday, Jun 19 at 10:23 AM

Just a quick update from our veterinarian Deb Sheaffer. Unfortunately given the timeframe Dr. Sheaffer is talking about, it it looking more and more likely that the best case scenario is that we will have to train the red-tail fledgling (K2) to hunt in a flight cage if he is releasable. He is falling far behind his wild sibling and with each day it gets harder to reintegrate him with his family.The following is from Dr. Sheaffer:

About 30% of the lens has a traumatic cataract. These are caused by a "whiplash" type injury so would be consistent with either HBC or other head trauma. In young birds there is the chance that the cataract will at least partially clear. When she recheckedby the opthamologist the eye it looked slightly better, but we really need to wait for another week or so to see what happens. We're treating with drops to lessen the inflammation. Unfortunately, even with an ophthalmologists tools, the retina couldn't be visualized due to the cataract. So there's the chance the retina detached also. This doesn't happen often in hawks like it does in owls, though, due to the eye structure. Unfortunately it's just a wait and see for a few more days.

On a positive note, ecollins continues to report in on the other sibling and tells us that he she appears to be doing just fine. Thanks Ms. Collins! For those of you who don't read through all the posts, ecollins posted the following on June 17th at 10:35 am.

"Right now, all three birds are on the corner of the building! Parents are one floor above the fledgling."

And the following on June 18th at 8:42 am:

"This morning Mom and the fledgling are on the same corner of the building. It's very rewarding to get to see them this much! I'm going to miss them this weekend."

 

Enjoy the weekend. See lots of birds.

Bob

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